Khan Academy International

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Current snapshot of the most dubbed languages.  Click on the graph to see more. 

Current snapshot of the most dubbed languages.  Click on the graph to see more. 

The story of Hitoshi, one of Khan Academy’s Japanese translators, on German television (yeah it’s in German).  Hitoshi decided to direct his energy following a racist incident towards spreading education through Khan Academy translations.
A positive and negative emotion can not occupy our minds at the same time.  The choice is ours.  Thank you for showing the way Hitoshi!

The story of Hitoshi, one of Khan Academy’s Japanese translators, on German television (yeah it’s in German).  Hitoshi decided to direct his energy following a racist incident towards spreading education through Khan Academy translations.

A positive and negative emotion can not occupy our minds at the same time.  The choice is ours.  Thank you for showing the way Hitoshi!

The Czech volunteer community organized another translation marathon on Saturday, the 1st of March.  They had 40 volunteers subtitling Khan Academy videos from ten in the morning till four in the evening.  Nice going y’all!
The event took place at Faculty of Informatics, Masaryk University (Brno) and was  sponsored by Microsoft CZ.

The Czech volunteer community organized another translation marathon on Saturday, the 1st of March.  They had 40 volunteers subtitling Khan Academy videos from ten in the morning till four in the evening.  Nice going y’all!

The event took place at Faculty of Informatics, Masaryk University (Brno) and was  sponsored by Microsoft CZ.

Experiment in Las Varas, Mexico
Las Varas is a small agricultural town of under 25,000 people near the west coast of Mexico. It is not a tourist destination and therefore does not benefit from tourist goodwill and donations.  
A small private school el Colegio Patria, (dedicated to better education in this low income pueblo) decided to run an experiment using Khan Academy to teach math.  Over the summer break of 2012, the directors built a computer lab and folks from Canada donated some computers.  In all, the experiment involved the use of Khan Academy to provide personalized learning and support to 20 kids, aged 10-12, over a period of 3 weeks.
To use online resources successfully meant a significant adjustment on the part of teachers.  One teacher worked over the year and after school hours to get the computer lab functioning, to familiarize himself with the site, to enroll students in the Khan Academy and to coach them in the project. Thank you Maestro Alfredo, and also Maestro Hector.
El Colegio Patrio just finished their experiment to use Khan Academy to provide its students a personalized and challenging way to learn.  According to Diane Douglas, who is from Canada and has been volunteering for the project, “The kids are hooked. I deem it a success. MASSIVE.”
more: kanayarit.wordpress.com

Experiment in Las Varas, Mexico

Las Varas is a small agricultural town of under 25,000 people near the west coast of Mexico. It is not a tourist destination and therefore does not benefit from tourist goodwill and donations.  

A small private school el Colegio Patria, (dedicated to better education in this low income pueblo) decided to run an experiment using Khan Academy to teach math.  Over the summer break of 2012, the directors built a computer lab and folks from Canada donated some computers.  In all, the experiment involved the use of Khan Academy to provide personalized learning and support to 20 kids, aged 10-12, over a period of 3 weeks.

To use online resources successfully meant a significant adjustment on the part of teachers.  One teacher worked over the year and after school hours to get the computer lab functioning, to familiarize himself with the site, to enroll students in the Khan Academy and to coach them in the project. Thank you Maestro Alfredo, and also Maestro Hector.

El Colegio Patrio just finished their experiment to use Khan Academy to provide its students a personalized and challenging way to learn.  According to Diane Douglas, who is from Canada and has been volunteering for the project, “The kids are hooked. I deem it a success. MASSIVE.”

more: kanayarit.wordpress.com

Feb 7
SPINNING THE GLOBE
From time to time, we’ll “spin the globe” and pick a translation effort to spotlight.  Today, our figurative dart landed on Burma (also known as Myanmar), whose unusual language presents some unique translation challenges.
The San Francisco Bay Area has proven fertile ground for a volunteer group contributing to make Khan Academy accessible in Burmese.  A vibrant community of expatriates has settled in the area, and for some, coming together to translate KA videos is a natural extension of their activism for their homeland.  This small but mighty group, spearheaded by Advocate Nyunt Than, finds strength in collaboration. “Many of us left Burma due to brutal oppression, so we are always thinking about helping the people back home,” relates Than.  “Projects like this are not the first time that we have come together as a community.”  Than himself left the Burmese village of Kamase for Singapore in 1992 and moved to the US in 1996.  Last winter, on his first trip back to Burma in 20 years, he spoke publicly about how Khan Academy can play a part in Burma’s education reforms.
As an Advocate, Nyunt supports his tight-knit collective with encouraging words and holiday greetings via email, as well as by hosting weekly Google HangOuts.  “Many of us are not seasoned translators,” Than admits, “but are willing to do whatever we can to bring world-class education in to the hands of the millions of Burmese.  So, we are diving into water though we don’t know how to swim well, but the experience will make all of us stronger and better translators as we learn and grow from each other.”  In January, Nyunt visited Yangon and shared his community’s efforts with a broader audience of stakeholders.
The Burmese volunteer community has focused mostly on subtitling, and Burma’s unique written language, while beautiful, has presented challenges.  “Our alphabet comes from Brahmi script and uses the shapes of the sun and the moon—very round,” says Than.  Unfortunately, the popular font used by most Burmese is not unicode-compliant and is thus not supported by Apple, Google and Microsoft.  This has created headaches for subtitlers, one of several hurdles.  Spotty Internet availability in Burma is another.  Than notes that Khan Academy provides one way to work around this challenge: “We are very interested in KA Lite as a way to connect communities throughout Burma.”

SPINNING THE GLOBE

From time to time, we’ll “spin the globe” and pick a translation effort to spotlight.  Today, our figurative dart landed on Burma (also known as Myanmar), whose unusual language presents some unique translation challenges.

The San Francisco Bay Area has proven fertile ground for a volunteer group contributing to make Khan Academy accessible in Burmese.  A vibrant community of expatriates has settled in the area, and for some, coming together to translate KA videos is a natural extension of their activism for their homeland.  This small but mighty group, spearheaded by Advocate Nyunt Than, finds strength in collaboration. “Many of us left Burma due to brutal oppression, so we are always thinking about helping the people back home,” relates Than.  “Projects like this are not the first time that we have come together as a community.”  Than himself left the Burmese village of Kamase for Singapore in 1992 and moved to the US in 1996.  Last winter, on his first trip back to Burma in 20 years, he spoke publicly about how Khan Academy can play a part in Burma’s education reforms.

As an Advocate, Nyunt supports his tight-knit collective with encouraging words and holiday greetings via email, as well as by hosting weekly Google HangOuts.  “Many of us are not seasoned translators,” Than admits, “but are willing to do whatever we can to bring world-class education in to the hands of the millions of Burmese.  So, we are diving into water though we don’t know how to swim well, but the experience will make all of us stronger and better translators as we learn and grow from each other.”  In January, Nyunt visited Yangon and shared his community’s efforts with a broader audience of stakeholders.

The Burmese volunteer community has focused mostly on subtitling, and Burma’s unique written language, while beautiful, has presented challenges.  “Our alphabet comes from Brahmi script and uses the shapes of the sun and the moon—very round,” says Than.  Unfortunately, the popular font used by most Burmese is not unicode-compliant and is thus not supported by Apple, Google and Microsoft.  This has created headaches for subtitlers, one of several hurdles.  Spotty Internet availability in Burma is another.  Than notes that Khan Academy provides one way to work around this challenge: “We are very interested in KA Lite as a way to connect communities throughout Burma.”

Feb 3
Current snapshot of the most dubbed (as opposed to captioned) languages.  Click on the graph to see more. 

Current snapshot of the most dubbed (as opposed to captioned) languages.  Click on the graph to see more. 

We were delighted to have a delegation of Khan Academy’s international supporters from Mexico, Brazil, Turkey and France visit our offices last week!

We were delighted to have a delegation of Khan Academy’s international supporters from Mexico, Brazil, Turkey and France visit our offices last week!

Dec 5
Latest snapshot of dubbed and re-done videos, sorted by amount of translated content. 
Click here to view the latest list of all the Khan Academy videos mapped to the translated content.

Latest snapshot of dubbed and re-done videos, sorted by amount of translated content. 

Click here to view the latest list of all the Khan Academy videos mapped to the translated content.

42 translators joined forces for the third Prague marathon at Czech Technical University sponsored by Microsoft CA.  Armed with awesome attitudes and plenty of determination, they crossed the finish line with more than 50 new translations!  We’d call that a win!

42 translators joined forces for the third Prague marathon at Czech Technical University sponsored by Microsoft CA.  Armed with awesome attitudes and plenty of determination, they crossed the finish line with more than 50 new translations!  We’d call that a win!